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the election, they went on with the election anyway. >> this is a black elected member of the city council, is that right? >> that's correct. because of that, he lost his seat. d.o.j. came back -- you know, deemed it, i guess, unconstitutional. and they had to redo. and they had an at-large vote and he was the top vote-getter. it was designed to dilute the black community. >> is this what this case ultimately rests on? perfect for this, i've worked in the court. i've spent some time in the court. how fact down this case seems. it really seems like the court is going to make some determination about this basically sociological fact about the covered jurisdictions which is how much racism is there? how imbedded are these practices? it seems a strange thing for the court to be doing? >> it is a strange thing, chris. what's interesting congress asked all these questions about whether or not racial discrimination is prevalent in the covered jurisdictions. they analyzed looking at the covered jurisdictions versus the uncovered. i know there's rhetoric that he didn't do that. but they did. and co
's the challenge. the president said he's going to target 20 cities. but we are, where ever we are, must become part of the solution or are we a part of the problem? we need people as maureen forte has said, from the bottom up that where the laws are there, where other things are there, that is fine. but we need to all be part of change in the mentality, change in the thoughts, changing the dreams. of young people to understand gun violence and destruction is not something they have to live with. they can be something no matter what their background. no matter what their circumstance. we all have to put our shoulder to the wheel. there's been 1833 people killed since newtown. we all have to be committed, not just look to the white house. he's got to start in your house and my house. thanks for watching. i'm a.m. sharpton. have a great weekend. "hardball" starts right now. >>> cruising for a bruising. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. as butch cassidy once asked, who are these guys? what a ratty bunch. they spend their
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
a place that's its richard king maps -- redistricting maps. the only african a member of the city council lost his seat. seems like a perfect reason why we need section 5. the only black member lost his district. this stuff happens more often in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. so many different people are urging that section 5 be upheld. host: we have a tweet for you from maverick. guest: well, if they say it needs to be expanded, that would treat state the same. ari keep saying there is more demonstration -- discrimination in cover states and the facts don't bear that out. there's no evidence that states are evading court decrees or otherwise practicing discrimination, and that's what led to passage of section 5. section 2 remains. that was the only objection in the entire state of alabama in the last 12 years. one objection. the entire state should be remain covered under section 5 because of one objection? host: sacramento, california, dj. caller: voting is not a privilege, it is a right. i should not be restricted because of my color in that pursued. you guys never have t
. when you have the most important political city in the country, washington d. c., and the post has been the dominant voice in that city for a long time, members of congress, federal policymakers, whether they want to or not, that is their principal link with print journalism. sure, you get the "times" or the "wall street journal" or the "l. a. times" -- the people, they meet and talk with by that morning, there is the general presumption everybody has read the post. >> everybody has read the post, do they still say that? >> i do not know. probably not. they may very well have glanced at the website, had and look -- had a look at an aggregator. >> how long did you work for the post? >> from 1979 until 1981. >> why did you leave? >> how i went there is kind of fascinating. i had written a couple of op-ed pieces. i had not been in journalism. i was in politics. they approached me and said, would you like to write political editorials for "the washington post?" not knowing any better, i said yes. she said, write a once a week column. so i did that through the campaign of 1980, covering the
and their educators in newtown. last year there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown every four months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common sense proposals to make it harder for criminals to get their hands on a gun. >> now, i think that's smart. welcome back. of course, thafers president obama speaking earlier this afternoon in chicago, his hometown, stemming gun violence has become a major second term agenda item for the president, of course. some of the most memorable moments from his state of the union address actually dealt with giving victims of gun violence the opportunity to have congress vote on new gun control measures. they deserve a vote, he said it many times. he faces strong opposition from the nra of course despite wayne lapierre's oven apocalyptic rhetoric. enter mayor michael bloomberg of new york who is putting his money where his money is actually. he has started a super pac to back politicians who speak out on gun control
on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown every four months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common sense proposals to make it harder for criminals to get their hands on a gun. >> now, i think that's smart. welcome back. of course, that was president obama speaking earlier this afternoon in chicago, his hometown. stemming gun violence has become a major second term agenda item for the president, of course. some of the most memorable moments from his state of the union address actually dealt with giving victims of gun >> now, i think that's smart. welcome back. of course, that was president obama speaking earlier this afternoon in chicago, his hometown. stemming gun violence has become a major second term agenda item for the president, of course. some of the most memorable moments from his state of the union address actually dealt with giving victims of gun violence the opportunity to have congress vote on new gun control measures. they deserve a vote, he said it many times.
district on the city council went in a district 71% african-american to 30% african-american, and the only african-american member of the city council in that city in alabama lost his seat. so that to me seems like a perfect reason why we still need section 5. they drew the district in such a way that it resulted in the on black member of the city council losing his district. yes, this stuff happens in ohio and pennsylvania and wisconsin. but it happens more often, still, in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. and that's why section 5 so many different people across the legal spectrum are urging it be upheld. host: maverick rights in and says, the voting act law should expand to all states after seeing the obvious suppression attempts and tactics in the 2012 election. guest: well, if they are going to say it needs to be expanded, yes, that would then treat states the same. and particularly in terms of the evidence. ari keeps saying that there's more discrimination in covered states. that is simply not true. the facts do not bear that out at all. and if are you going to have sectio
that led to getting rid of the lone representation from an african-american city council member. and judi, there was a moment where justice sotomayor said well, they may have changed, but you in fact haven't. >> and this is what is important in this case. under the voting rights act if you have not committed discrimination and are covered by section five, you can bail out. there have been about 200 jurisdictions that have bailed out because they have a clean record. shelby county, so too bad on you, you actually couldn't bail out, you have a history, and it is a present-day history. so i think this is where the case is going to come down to is that congress had enough information before it. president george w. bush signed the authorization of the voting rights act to section five. so there was enough before them. shelby county, clean up your act, get over it. stop discriminating, and bail out like the others have done. >> wonderful to have you here, and judith brown, thank you for joining us. >> and coming up, more on the voting rights act for republicans. what is really driving the conse
's helicopter flying over the city of chicago. she went to a corner store to get a pop and some chips and was caught in gang cross fire. a senior in high school. her family said she wanted to be a lawyer. wolf. >> is it on track now, the gang violence, the deaths, the senseless killings that are going on in chicago right now, potentially to be even worse this year than last? because last was awful. >> reporter: yeah, it was. and yes, the answer to your question, if things continue as they have already this year in the month of january, 42 murders, that's the most in the month of january since 2002. if it continues at this pace, unbelievably, chicago will have more murders this year than even last. >> ted rowlands, thanks very much. this important note to our viewers. i'm going to be speaking with jenay mcfarland's mother about her family's tragedy, later tonight, 8:00 p.m. eastern, i'm filling in for anderson cooper on "a.c. 360." >>> shock at the apparent suicide of country star mindy mccready. her life sounded like the lyrics of a heartbreak ballad, including drug abuse, domestic vi
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
been, we have a devastating level of youth unemployment in cities like yours. let's focus on that because we love and care for people. we do what is good and political but may not be honest economics. host: current federal minimum wage is $7.25. bob in chesapeake, virginia, independent line. caller: representative, the minimum-wage is used as a political football. i think would be a good thing if we would set the minimum wage on all of the jobs in the country as a national need and a global competitive need instead of letting the minimum wage be brought up every so often as a political football. they need to set the minimum wage on all the jobs. then they can eliminate the union hassles and we can be more globally competitive. guest: you are correct it is used as a political football to get you some wonderful movement on your political base. if we were to think like an economist, you would not have a minimum wage. you would allow the market to generate those wages. if you're going to move to a minimum wage, are you going to have the training wage and for those folks who ar
morgan city and from tibideaux. they said why are you here? i said the same reason you are. louisiana workers go everywhere. we're proud to do it, but we would be glad to be close to home, canada and mexico. our refineries which for the first time in our nation's history -- not in history, but for the first time in many years, our manufacturing base is expanding. and finally, i would just say in this colloquy, ask the senator from north dakota, did -- has he had a conversation happen with the oil minister from canada -- i think it's minister olivier, has he talked with him at all recently? because i did have a conversation with him yesterday and i wanted to maybe share that with the senator from north dakota. mr. hoeven: i recently visited with the after, gary dewar, please go ahead and relate your conversation. ms. landrieu: i wanted to say i had a very good conversation with the canadian minister of natural resources. we had a long conversation, ten or 15 minutes and explained the importance of this development for canada. he also said to me what i just shared with you all, that he
your doctor about spiriva. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. there's no subtext... just tacos. yeah, it's our job to make you want it. but honestly... it's not that hard. old el paso. when you gotta have mexican. >>> at the top of the show we change things up and ask you why are you awake? producer john with all of the answers. >> i'm trying to enjoy the last normal day before the sequester ends life as we know it. >> it will be good, sequester or not. as a preview of that, "morning joe" starts right now. thanks for watching. ♪ >> all right. good morning. it's thursday, february 28th. welcome to "morning joe." >> i'm mad. >> why are you mad? >> i'm mad. >> oh lord. >> are we goin
they are actually doing about that problem will not help with that problem. details ahead. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ and the next great idea could be yours. do you guys ride? well... no. sometimes, yeah. yes. well, if you know anybody else who also rides, send them here -- we got great coverage. it's not like bikers love their bikes more than life itself. i doubt anyone will even notice. leading the pack in motorcycle insurance. now, that's progressive. call or click today. aarrggh! if we took the already great sentra apart and completely reimagined it with best-in-class combined mpg and more interior room than corolla and civic and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation, and other handy stuff? yeah, that would be cool. introducing the all-new
to infiltrate america. >> they're expanding to eight cities, one of them being detroit, michigan. it is a large community of muslim americans where sleeper cells have been detected. >> john: megan kelly, how can someone so smart and so pretty have a show that's so stupid and so ugly? but if this little bit of tv gold illustrates something, it is why fox news is a mecca for people who hate mecca. so let's get a few things straight. first, the correspondent complained that petro dorals are funding this network. i love it when the people who brought us george w. bush warn us of the evils of oil money. so i could tell you about all of the petrochemical dollars fox news boss mourdock makes from his investments but i don't want to upset him because i don't feel like getting my phone hacked. i'll mention a name you don't hear often on fox. that of saudi arabian prince callal. the second largest shareholder in news corp. the number two guy at fox news and where do you think he got his money? and it's true. as contributor lisa just pointed out that there are many muslims in the state of michigan. they'r
latin-american drug gangs have invaded every city of significant size in the united states. phoenix is one of the kidnapping capitals of the world. states on the u.s./mexico border may be the first places to suffer from cartel violence. by no means are they the last. all of the latin-american drug gangs to fight on through on your way to work, he says guns would help that. >> bill: this is why you need an ar-15 in every house in columbus ohio. >> after hurricane sandy we saw the hellish world that the gun prohibitions see. looters ran wild. there was no food, water or electricity. if you wanted to walk several miles to get supplies, you better get back before dark or you might not get home at all. it is the most paranoid thing i have ever read. it is crazy! >> bill: he is certifiably insane. >> we'll tweet out a link. >> bill: i can't believe the nra doesn't recognize that. every time they put him out in front, they lose ground. >> he's not helping. >> bill: alex, that gets back to the issue of ticking through some of the things -- the main ideas in the president's state of the unio
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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